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A Charmed Vision A Charmed Vision
A Charmed Vision: the Art of Carolyn Plochman
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It is hoped that this book with its reproductions of forty-four paintings will serve as the window through which many more viewers will encounter the “charmed vision” of Carolyn Plochmann. Intensely personal in its inspiration yet remarkably universal in its implications, Plochmann’s work delights the eye with its resonant color and richly painted surfaces and the introspective eye with its haunting iconography and the suggestive juxtaposition of its imagery. Beneath the surface and encoded in the composition of these beautiful compelling works, the artist’s reflections about the complexity and diversity, the simplicity and the universality of the human condition lie waiting to be discovered by the discerning viewer. Carolyn Gassan Plochmann was born in Toledo, Ohio, where she had her first one-person exhibition at the Toledo Museum of Art when she was fifteen years old. After receiving her undergraduate degree at the University of Ohio, Plochmann received a Master of Fine Arts degree, as a George W. Stevens Fellow, at the State University of Iowa. She then served as supervisor of art at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, where she studied anatomy at the university’s medical school. The artist lives, as she has for many years, in Boskydell, Illinois, a small town near Carbondale, with her husband, George Kimball Plochmann, a philosopher, writer, and editor. In a career that spans more than four decades, Plochmann has received numerous awards and her work has been exhibited widely, exciting the praise and recognition of her peers and of critics. During this time, while ignoring artistic trends and fashions, Plochmann has developed an art so positive and evocative that it prompted R. Buckminster Fuller to write: “She finds and now reports to us a message of home, of the possibilities of man’s regeneration in the universe.”
Christian Decker Design Blocks Apron Kit Christian Decker Design Blocks Apron Kit
Christian Decker Embroidery Design Blocks Apron Kit. with hand-stamped material, floss and needle.
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CHRISTIAN DECKER EMBROIDERY DESIGN BLOCKS Christian Decker, a German immigrant, settled in Evansville, Indiana in 1858. By trade he made pianos and melodeons. Out of the leftover wood, he would create hand-stamping embroidery design blocks for his wife and six daughters. He would glue a paper with the design pattern on to the wood block and bend strips of zinc to follow the pattern. Then, he would pound the metal into the wood, creating a cookie-cutter style stamp. He drew most of his designs but adapted some from traditional patterns and pouncing paper designs. Several stamping blocks with related and coordinating designs were generally used to create a complete design. The Decker family used the designs for soutache braid, beading, and embroidery to decorate bed and table linens, petticoats, skirts and baby clothes. For stamping, Mrs. Decker stretched oilcloth on a frame on which she then mixed the stamping powder. The design side of the block was pressed on the oilcloth then carefully set on the fabric. By 1900, iron-on transfers became popular and readily available. They were neat and easy to use while hand-stamping blocks were troublesome to use and difficult to store. Within a generation many collections of hand-stamping blocks had been discarded or put into attics as was the Decker collection. In 1973, the heirs of Christian Decker gave the 500 plus antique blocks to the custody of the Conrad Baker Foundation on provision that they be used and not merely exhibited. Soon following even more blocks surfaced from other family members. The Foundation, which now is the Old Courthouse Preservation Society, set up the Christian Decker Shop. It was ran entirely of volunteers, and all the proceeds went to preserving the Old Court House as a cultural center. By 1986, the Shop was closed and the entire collection of 583 blocks were given to the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science for cultural preservation. These are the last remaining kits produced by the Christian Decker Shop.
Kodi Bear Backpack Kodi Bear Backpack
Evansville Museum Kodi Backpack
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Collectible Evansville Museum’s Kodi, the Kodiak Grizzly Bear, backpack with draw string closure.
Calculator Calculator
Evansville Museum Calculator
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Collectible Evansville Museum Calculator is pocket size and lightweight. Battery included.
Apothecary Jar Apothecary Jar
Evansville Museum Apothecary Jar
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Collectible Evansville Museum Apothecary Jar with lid. Measures 5.5 inches high, approximately 4 inches in diameter.
Car Coasters Car Coasters
Evansville Museum Car Coasters
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Collectible Evansville Museum stone Car Coasters are 2 5/8 inches in diameter and fit most cup holders.
Christian Decker Crib Quilt Embroidery Kit
Christian Decker Embroidery Design Blocks Crib Quilt, Vintage one of a kind hand stamped quilt kit
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Crib Quilt Kit Contents: Super Vino quilt top hand-stamped with Decker’s Design Super Vino quilt back DMC six-stranded floss, 12 colors Mountain Mist Quilt Batting Embroidery needle Quilting needle Christian Decker label Spool of White Quilting Thread CHRISTIAN DECKER EMBROIDERY DESIGN BLOCKS Christian Decker, a German immigrant, settled in Evansville, Indiana in 1858. By trade he made pianos and melodeons. Out of the leftover wood, he would create hand-stamping embroidery design blocks for his wife and six daughters. He would glue a paper with the design pattern on to the wood block and bend strips of zinc to follow the pattern. Then, he would pound the metal into the wood, creating a cookie-cutter style stamp. He drew most of his designs but adapted some from traditional patterns and pouncing paper designs. Several stamping blocks with related and coordinating designs were generally used to create a complete design. The Decker family used the designs for soutache braid, beading, and embroidery to decorate bed and table linens, petticoats, skirts and baby clothes. For stamping, Mrs. Decker stretched oilcloth on a frame on which she then mixed the stamping powder. The design side of the block was pressed on the oilcloth then carefully set on the fabric. By 1900, iron-on transfers became popular and readily available. They were neat and easy to use while hand-stamping blocks were troublesome to use and difficult to store. Within a generation many collections of hand-stamping blocks had been discarded or put into attics as was the Decker collection. In 1973, the heirs of Christian Decker gave the 500 plus antique blocks to the custody of the Conrad Baker Foundation on provision that they be used and not merely exhibited. Soon following even more blocks surfaced from other family members. The Foundation, which now is the Old Courthouse Preservation Society, set up the Christian Decker Shop. It was ran entirely of volunteers, and all the proceeds went to preserving the Old Court House as a cultural center. By 1986, the Shop was closed and the entire collection of 583 blocks were given to the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science for cultural preservation. These are the last remaining kits produced by the Christian Decker Shop.
Christian Decker Ornament Kit, Christmas Tree Christian Decker Ornament Kit, Christmas Tree
Christian Decker Ornament Kit, Christmas Tree Stamp Design Ornament Kit with hand-stamped felt and batting
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CHRISTIAN DECKER EMBROIDERY DESIGN BLOCKS Christian Decker, a German immigrant, settled in Evansville, Indiana in 1858. By trade he made pianos and melodeons. Out of the leftover wood, he would create hand-stamping embroidery design blocks for his wife and six daughters. He would glue a paper with the design pattern on to the wood block and bend strips of zinc to follow the pattern. Then, he would pound the metal into the wood, creating a cookie-cutter style stamp. He drew most of his designs but adapted some from traditional patterns and pouncing paper designs. Several stamping blocks with related and coordinating designs were generally used to create a complete design. The Decker family used the designs for soutache braid, beading, and embroidery to decorate bed and table linens, petticoats, skirts and baby clothes. For stamping, Mrs. Decker stretched oilcloth on a frame on which she then mixed the stamping powder. The design side of the block was pressed on the oilcloth then carefully set on the fabric. By 1900, iron-on transfers became popular and readily available. They were neat and easy to use while hand-stamping blocks were troublesome to use and difficult to store. Within a generation many collections of hand-stamping blocks had been discarded or put into attics as was the Decker collection. In 1973, the heirs of Christian Decker gave the 500 plus antique blocks to the custody of the Conrad Baker Foundation on provision that they be used and not merely exhibited. Soon following even more blocks surfaced from other family members. The Foundation, which now is the Old Courthouse Preservation Society, set up the Christian Decker Shop. It was ran entirely of volunteers, and all the proceeds went to preserving the Old Court House as a cultural center. By 1986, the Shop was closed and the entire collection of 583 blocks were given to the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science for cultural preservation. These are the last remaining kits produced by the Christian Decker Shop.
Christian Decker Ornament Kit, Bird Christian Decker Ornament Kit, Bird
Crhistian Decker Embroidery Blocks Design Ornament Kit with hand stamped Bird, Ornament Kit with hand-stamped felt and batting
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CHRISTIAN DECKER EMBROIDERY DESIGN BLOCKS Christian Decker, a German immigrant, settled in Evansville, Indiana in 1858. By trade he made pianos and melodeons. Out of the leftover wood, he would create hand-stamping embroidery design blocks for his wife and six daughters. He would glue a paper with the design pattern on to the wood block and bend strips of zinc to follow the pattern. Then, he would pound the metal into the wood, creating a cookie-cutter style stamp. He drew most of his designs but adapted some from traditional patterns and pouncing paper designs. Several stamping blocks with related and coordinating designs were generally used to create a complete design. The Decker family used the designs for soutache braid, beading, and embroidery to decorate bed and table linens, petticoats, skirts and baby clothes. For stamping, Mrs. Decker stretched oilcloth on a frame on which she then mixed the stamping powder. The design side of the block was pressed on the oilcloth then carefully set on the fabric. By 1900, iron-on transfers became popular and readily available. They were neat and easy to use while hand-stamping blocks were troublesome to use and difficult to store. Within a generation many collections of hand-stamping blocks had been discarded or put into attics as was the Decker collection. In 1973, the heirs of Christian Decker gave the 500 plus antique blocks to the custody of the Conrad Baker Foundation on provision that they be used and not merely exhibited. Soon following even more blocks surfaced from other family members. The Foundation, which now is the Old Courthouse Preservation Society, set up the Christian Decker Shop. It was ran entirely of volunteers, and all the proceeds went to preserving the Old Court House as a cultural center. By 1986, the Shop was closed and the entire collection of 583 blocks were given to the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science for cultural preservation. These are the last remaining kits produced by the Christian Decker Shop.
Christian Decker Ornament Kit, Fish Christian Decker Ornament Kit, Fish
Christian Decker Embroidery Blocks Design Ornament Kit, hand stamped Fish, Ornament Kit with hand-stamped felt and batting
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CHRISTIAN DECKER EMBROIDERY DESIGN BLOCKS Christian Decker, a German immigrant, settled in Evansville, Indiana in 1858. By trade he made pianos and melodeons. Out of the leftover wood, he would create hand-stamping embroidery design blocks for his wife and six daughters. He would glue a paper with the design pattern on to the wood block and bend strips of zinc to follow the pattern. Then, he would pound the metal into the wood, creating a cookie-cutter style stamp. He drew most of his designs but adapted some from traditional patterns and pouncing paper designs. Several stamping blocks with related and coordinating designs were generally used to create a complete design. The Decker family used the designs for soutache braid, beading, and embroidery to decorate bed and table linens, petticoats, skirts and baby clothes. For stamping, Mrs. Decker stretched oilcloth on a frame on which she then mixed the stamping powder. The design side of the block was pressed on the oilcloth then carefully set on the fabric. By 1900, iron-on transfers became popular and readily available. They were neat and easy to use while hand-stamping blocks were troublesome to use and difficult to store. Within a generation many collections of hand-stamping blocks had been discarded or put into attics as was the Decker collection. In 1973, the heirs of Christian Decker gave the 500 plus antique blocks to the custody of the Conrad Baker Foundation on provision that they be used and not merely exhibited. Soon following even more blocks surfaced from other family members. The Foundation, which now is the Old Courthouse Preservation Society, set up the Christian Decker Shop. It was ran entirely of volunteers, and all the proceeds went to preserving the Old Court House as a cultural center. By 1986, the Shop was closed and the entire collection of 583 blocks were given to the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science for cultural preservation. These are the last remaining kits produced by the Christian Decker Shop.
Christian Decker Ornament Kit, Flower Christian Decker Ornament Kit, Flower
Christian Decker Embroidery Blocks Design Ornament Kit, hand stamped Flower, Ornament Kit with hand-stamped felt and batting
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CHRISTIAN DECKER EMBROIDERY DESIGN BLOCKS Christian Decker, a German immigrant, settled in Evansville, Indiana in 1858. By trade he made pianos and melodeons. Out of the leftover wood, he would create hand-stamping embroidery design blocks for his wife and six daughters. He would glue a paper with the design pattern on to the wood block and bend strips of zinc to follow the pattern. Then, he would pound the metal into the wood, creating a cookie-cutter style stamp. He drew most of his designs but adapted some from traditional patterns and pouncing paper designs. Several stamping blocks with related and coordinating designs were generally used to create a complete design. The Decker family used the designs for soutache braid, beading, and embroidery to decorate bed and table linens, petticoats, skirts and baby clothes. For stamping, Mrs. Decker stretched oilcloth on a frame on which she then mixed the stamping powder. The design side of the block was pressed on the oilcloth then carefully set on the fabric. By 1900, iron-on transfers became popular and readily available. They were neat and easy to use while hand-stamping blocks were troublesome to use and difficult to store. Within a generation many collections of hand-stamping blocks had been discarded or put into attics as was the Decker collection. In 1973, the heirs of Christian Decker gave the 500 plus antique blocks to the custody of the Conrad Baker Foundation on provision that they be used and not merely exhibited. Soon following even more blocks surfaced from other family members. The Foundation, which now is the Old Courthouse Preservation Society, set up the Christian Decker Shop. It was ran entirely of volunteers, and all the proceeds went to preserving the Old Court House as a cultural center. By 1986, the Shop was closed and the entire collection of 583 blocks were given to the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science for cultural preservation. These are the last remaining kits produced by the Christian Decker Shop.
Christian Decker Ornament Kit, Spray of Dots Christian Decker Ornament Kit, Spray of Dots
Christian Decker Embroidery Blocks Design Ornament Kit, hand stamped Spray of Dots, Ornament Kit with hand-stamped felt and batting
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CHRISTIAN DECKER EMBROIDERY DESIGN BLOCKS Christian Decker, a German immigrant, settled in Evansville, Indiana in 1858. By trade he made pianos and melodeons. Out of the leftover wood, he would create hand-stamping embroidery design blocks for his wife and six daughters. He would glue a paper with the design pattern on to the wood block and bend strips of zinc to follow the pattern. Then, he would pound the metal into the wood, creating a cookie-cutter style stamp. He drew most of his designs but adapted some from traditional patterns and pouncing paper designs. Several stamping blocks with related and coordinating designs were generally used to create a complete design. The Decker family used the designs for soutache braid, beading, and embroidery to decorate bed and table linens, petticoats, skirts and baby clothes. For stamping, Mrs. Decker stretched oilcloth on a frame on which she then mixed the stamping powder. The design side of the block was pressed on the oilcloth then carefully set on the fabric. By 1900, iron-on transfers became popular and readily available. They were neat and easy to use while hand-stamping blocks were troublesome to use and difficult to store. Within a generation many collections of hand-stamping blocks had been discarded or put into attics as was the Decker collection. In 1973, the heirs of Christian Decker gave the 500 plus antique blocks to the custody of the Conrad Baker Foundation on provision that they be used and not merely exhibited. Soon following even more blocks surfaced from other family members. The Foundation, which now is the Old Courthouse Preservation Society, set up the Christian Decker Shop. It was ran entirely of volunteers, and all the proceeds went to preserving the Old Court House as a cultural center. By 1986, the Shop was closed and the entire collection of 583 blocks were given to the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science for cultural preservation. These are the last remaining kits produced by the Christian Decker Shop.
Desk Set Desk Set
Collectible Evansville Museum Desk Set made of Recycled Materials includes a pen, a ruler, sticky flags in four colors and two pads of sticky notes.
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Collectible Evansville Museum Desk Set made of Recycled Materials includes a pen, a ruler, sticky flags in four colors and two pads of sticky notes.
Freeze Dried Ice Cream, Neopolitan Freeze Dried Ice Cream, Neopolitan
Freeze Dried Ice Cream, Neopolitan flavor
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Made from real ice cream delicious chocolate, vanilla and strawberry Originally developed for the early Apollo Missions, this “space treat” is frozen to -40 degrees F (-40 degrees C), then vacuum dried and placed in a special polyfoil pouch. Freeze dried foods are used by astronauts eating under weightless conditions in space.
Evansville Museum Notebook Evansville Museum Notebook
Collectible Evansville Museum Notebook has lined paper, pen and variety of sticky notes.
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Collectible Evansville Museum Notebook has lined paper, pen and variety of sticky notes.
Object Project Object Project
Object Project: 5 Objects 15 Artists
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This fascinating collection of 28 works of art is the result of more than two years of creative industry by some of America’s leading proponents of Contemporary Realism. 16 Contemporary American Artists were challenged by the Museum to create two works of art that contained the same five objects: a ball of string a mirror a glass of water a bone a moth In his spirited and insightful essay, M. Stephen Doherty, distinguished Editor-in-Chief of American Artist, Watercolor, Drawing & Workshop Magazines, chronicles with a discerning eye the journey that brought together ten men and five women from vastly different backgrounds and life experiences to lend their unique narrative visions to a compelling common goal.
Objects of Desire Objects of Desire
Objects of Desire: The Art of Frederick Carder The Alan and Susan Shovers Collection of Steuben Glass
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In just six years, Alan and Susan Shovers have brought together a collection that would rival any of its kind in private hands. It explores with taste and discernment the work of one of the giants in the creation and development of art glass. Frederick Carder, an Englishman who came to the United States in 1903, co-founded the celebrated American glasshouse known as the Steuben Glass Works. In the ensuing years, his stunning and innovative artistic achievements would earn him a unique place in the annals of American Decorative Arts. This lavishly illustrated book, meticulously photographed and annotated by Alan Shovers, gives not only keen insights into the complex techniques and creative spirit of a master craftsman, but also reflects the zeal of a collector whose heart and imagination have been captured by objects that are, at once, supremely well-made and beautiful. An invaluable reference and a visual delight, this book will complement the library of both the seasoned connoisseur and anyone who takes pleasure in the rare and exquisite object.
Pen and Pencil Set Pen and Pencil Set
Collectible Evansville Museum Pens and Pencils Set has a carrying tube has holds pens, pencils and a pencil sharpener.
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Collectible Evansville Museum Pens and Pencils Set has a carrying tube has holds pens, pencils and a pencil sharpener.
Christian Decker Embroidery Pillow Kit, Rose Ring
Rose Ring Design Small Toss Pillow Kit Contents: Super Vino pillow top hand-stamped with Decker’s Design Super Vino pillow back Eyelet Lace Mountain Mist Quilt Batting 1-Skein DMC six-stranded floss Embroidery needle Christian Decker label
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Christian Decker, a German immigrant, settled in Evansville, Indiana in 1858. By trade he made pianos and melodeons. Out of the leftover wood, he would create hand-stamping embroidery design blocks for his wife and six daughters. He would glue a paper with the design pattern on to the wood block and bend strips of zinc to follow the pattern. Then, he would pound the metal into the wood, creating a cookie-cutter style stamp. He drew most of his designs but adapted some from traditional patterns and pouncing paper designs. Several stamping blocks with related and coordinating designs were generally used to create a complete design. The Decker family used the designs for soutache braid, beading, and embroidery to decorate bed and table linens, petticoats, skirts and baby clothes. For stamping, Mrs. Decker stretched oilcloth on a frame on which she then mixed the stamping powder. The design side of the block was pressed on the oilcloth then carefully set on the fabric. By 1900, iron-on transfers became popular and readily available. They were neat and easy to use while hand-stamping blocks were troublesome to use and difficult to store. Within a generation many collections of hand-stamping blocks had been discarded or put into attics as was the Decker collection. In 1973, the heirs of Christian Decker gave the 500 plus antique blocks to the custody of the Conrad Baker Foundation on provision that they be used and not merely exhibited. Soon following even more blocks surfaced from other family members. The Foundation, which now is the Old Courthouse Preservation Society, set up the Christian Decker Shop. It was ran entirely of volunteers, and all the proceeds went to preserving the Old Court House as a cultural center. By 1986, the Shop was closed and the entire collection of 583 blocks were given to the Evansville Museum of Arts, History and Science for cultural preservation. These are the last remaining kits produced by the Christian Decker Shop.
Christian Decker Vintage Sampler Christian Decker Vintage Sampler
Vintage Sampler designed from the Christian Decker collection of Embroidery Design Blocks. The Sampler was created to celebrate the Nation's Bicentennial.
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Vintage Sampler designed from the Christian Decker collection of Embroidery Design Blocks. The Sampler was created to celebrate the Nation's Bicentennial. The printed area for embroidery is 22 inches high by 15.5 inches wide.

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